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Overall Good Health

A person’s self-reported general health status helps describe their perceived, overall well-being, even though health-related quality of life is not a direct measure of chronic diseases or other health conditions. Numerous studies have linked self-reported health status with longevity, lifespan, health behaviors, physical and mental health, social connectedness, and productivity.1

Findings in Santa Barbara County

Measure

The questionnaire measured general health status beginning with one question: "Would you say that in general your health is ...?" Respondents could choose one the following responses: “excellent,” “very good,” “good,” “fair,” or “poor.” A comparison of Santa Barbara County respondents and Californians in general is provided in Table 7 below.

Table 7. Percentage of Adults Reporting Good or Better Health and Healthy People 2020 Target

2016 Santa Barbara
BRFSS
California*Health People 2020
Target
%(95% CI) % (95% CI)
Overall 80.9 (78.9–83.6) 81.9 (78.3–85.4)
Male 81.7 (78.3–85.5) 83.5 (82.0–84.9)
Female 80.1 (77.1–83.1) 80.3 (78.9–81.8)
79.8
Hispanic 71.7 (66.9–76.4) 71.2 (69.0–73.3)
Non-Hispanic White 86.8 (84.3–89.2) 87.7 (86.6–88.8)
Other 86.6 (81.0– 92.2) NA

*2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.

Figure 12. Percentage of Adults Reporting Good or Better Health in Santa Barbara County, by Sex and Age

Percentage of Adults Reporting Good or Better Health in Santa Barbara County, by Sex and AgeClick to Enlarge

Figure 13. Percentage of Adults Reporting Good or Better Health in Santa Barbara County, by Race/Ethnicity, Educational Attainment, and Income

 Percentage of Adults Reporting Good or Better Health in Santa Barbara County, by Race/Ethnicity, Educational Attainment, and Income Click to Enlarge

Health Disparities

While Santa Barbara County is exceeding the HP 2020 target for self-reported good (or better) health, a slightly smaller percentage of residents report better health overall than Californians. In addition, the figure above shows health disparities, with smaller proportions of people without a high school degree and in the lowest income group reporting good health.

Figure 14. Percentage of Santa Barbara County Adults Describing Their Health as Fair or Poor, by County Subregion

Map - Percentage of Santa Barbara County Adults  Describing Their Health as Fair or Poor, by County SubregionClick to Enlarge

Factors and Health Outcomes Associated with General Health

Figure 15 (below) presents various individual, social, and environmental factors that contribute to general health. It compares adults in Santa Barbara County who report only fair or poor health to all Santa Barbara County adults and Californians as a whole.

Figure 15. Health and Risk Factors of Santa Barbara County Adults with Fair or Poor General Health (19.1%) Compared to All Santa Barbara County Adults and Californians* as a Whole

Health and Risk Factors of Santa Barbara County Adults with Fair or Poor General Health (19.1%) Compared to All Santa Barbara County Adults and Californians* as a WholeClick to Enlarge

* Data for California are not available for all indicators.

Figure 15 shows rates for a series of health indicators, organized into 4 larger sets of outcomes. For each indicator, the blue bar represents Santa Barbara County adults from our survey with fair or poor health; the orange bar is all residents from our survey; and the gray bar is for California as a whole. Compared to both Santa Barbara County overall and California overall, adults with fair or poor health report much higher rates of diabetes. This is also true for physical inactivity, having a mental health issue, and being obese. Adults with poor health are also more vulnerable in general than others, because they report much higher rates of both housing and food insecurity, not having health insurance, not having a high school degree, and not having received needed medical care due to the cost.

Key Opportunities for Population Health Improvement

What Businesses Can Do

  • Develop and implement a worksite wellness program (i.e., create or enhance places for physical activity, such as lunch-time walking groups or prompts to encourage employees to use stairs).2
  • Make the worksite smoke-free.3
  • Promote on-site, low-cost influenza vaccinations.4
  • Promote active employee engagement in the business.5

http://www.thecommunityguide.org/pa/environmental-policy/improvingaccess.html
http://www.thecommunityguide.org/pa/environmental-policy/podp.html
http://www.thecommunityguide.org/tobacco/smokefreepolicies.html
http://www.thecommunityguide.org/worksite/index.html
http://www.businessgrouphealth.org/toolkits/et_engagement.cfm


What Healthcare Providers Can Do

  • Integrate behavioral health screening with questions for patients about mental health and substance abuse.6
  • Use reminder systems to encourage screening patients for tobacco use and support quitting.7
  • Screen patients for diabetes and other chronic conditions.8
  • Refer eligible patients to evidence-based programs, including chronic disease self-management programs,9 and programs to prevent type 2 diabetes.10
  • Take cultural competence training to promote care of and talking with patients from diverse backgrounds, which can lead to improved health outcomes.11

http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/policies/behavioral-health-primary-care-integration
http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/policies/health-care-provider-reminder-systems-tobacco-cessation
https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/tools-resources/evidence-based-resource/diabetes-mellitus-type-2-in-adults-screening
http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/policies/chronic-disease-self-management-cdsm-programs
10 http://www.thecommunityguide.org/diabetes/combineddietandpa.html
https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention/index.html
11 http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/policies/cultural-competence-training-health-care-professionals


What Individuals Can Do

  • Balance calories eaten and calories burned in physical activity; choose a healthy diet with mostly whole grains, fruits, vegetables, lean protein, low-fat and fat-free dairy products, and drinking water.12
  • Get at least 150 minutes of moderate activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity per week and 2 days of strength training per week.13
  • Use a quit line to stop smoking, such as 1-800-NO-BUTTS.14
  • Use health insurance, if available, to schedule routine preventive care and consult with a primary care physician about health concerns, or access Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics,15 Santa Barbara County Public Health Department’s Health Care Centers,16 or other community-based care.

12 https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2010/
13 https://health.gov/paguidelines/guidelines/
14 http://www.countyhealthrankings.org/policies/tobacco-quitlines
15 http://www.sbclinics.org/
16 http://cosb.countyofsb.org/phd/primarycare.aspx?id=19192



1 https://www.cdc.gov/hrqol/wellbeing.htm

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