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Emergency Medicine & Trauma Services

Cottage’s three emergency departments are always open to help you. Our 24/7 emergency services are located within our Goleta, Santa Barbara and Santa Ynez hospitals. Together our hospitals see about 60,000 emergency visits annually.

To help find the appropriate level of care and shortest wait time in an emergency:

Make an Assessment

  • Do you feel this is a true emergency?
  • Do you feel it could be life-threatening?

If you are in a life-threatening emergency, or suspect you are having a stroke or heart attack, call 911 immediately.

When to Visit the Emergency Dept. at Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital

Visit the Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital Emergency Room if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • Deep cuts/lacerations that require stitches or a large open wound that won’t stop bleeding
  • Broken bones, sprains or dislocated joints
  • Minor abdominal pain
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Minor head or eye injuries
  • Flu or cold symptoms, sore throat, cough
  • High fevers or fevers with rash
  • Sudden testicular pain and swelling
  • Constipation
  • Back pain, chronic back pain
  • Painful urination
  • Minor dog bites, cat scratches
  • Chronic pain
  • STD symptoms
  • Intoxication and post intoxication nausea, vomiting, headache
  • Recurrent seizures with a history of seizure disorder
Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital - Emergency Room Map

Patients unable to be admitted at Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital will be cared for appropriately and transferred.

When to Visit the Emergency Dept. at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital

Visit the Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Emergency Room if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • Chest pain, especially if it radiates to your arm or jaw or is accompanied by sweating, vomiting or shortness of breath
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sudden clumsiness, loss of balance or fainting
  • Sudden difficulty speaking, or trouble understanding speech
  • Altered mental status or confusion, including suicidal thoughts
  • Sudden weakness or paralysis, especially on one side of the face or body
  • Severe heart palpitations
  • Newborn baby with a fever (a baby less than three months old with a temperature of 100.4 degrees or higher needs to be seen right away)
  • Seizures without a previous diagnosis of epilepsy
  • Falls that cause injury or occur while taking blood thinning medications
  • Sudden vision changes, including blurred or double vision and full or partial vision loss
  • Serious burns
  • Sudden, severe headache
  • Serious abdominal pain

When to Visit the Emergency Dept. at Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

Visit the Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital Emergency Room if you are experiencing any of the following symptoms:

  • If you are in a life-threatening emergency, or suspect you are having a stroke or heart attack, call 911 immediately
  • Deep cuts/lacerations that require stitches or a large open wound that won’t stop bleeding
  • Broken bones, sprains or dislocated joints
  • Minor abdominal pain
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Minor head or eye injuries
  • Flu or cold symptoms, sore throat, cough
  • High fevers or fevers with rash
  • Sudden testicular pain and swelling
  • Constipation
  • Back pain, chronic back pain
  • Painful urination
  • Minor dog bites, cat scratches
  • Chronic pain
  • STD symptoms
  • Intoxication and post intoxication nausea, vomiting, headache
  • Recurrent seizures with a history of seizure disorder

What to Expect

The same group of emergency physicians staffs our Santa Barbara and Goleta hospitals.

If you are in the Santa Ynez Valley, seek treatment at the Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital Emergency Department. You will be transferred if there is a need for additional care.

What to expect:

  • When you come to the ED, you will be evaluated by a triage nurse.
  • Triage is not a case of first-come, first-served. More urgent cases will always have priority.
  • Weekends and evenings are the busiest times, both for ambulance and walk-in patients.
  • The quietest time in the ED is generally 4:00–10:00 a.m.

Don’t bring the whole family with you.

Having one person accompany you to the ED is ideal. If you come by car, be aware that you will not be allowed to drive home alone from the ED if you receive pain medication.

Please don’t call the ED to ask about a patient.

We cannot, by law, release information about your friend.

Be prepared for medical care.

It’s helpful to carry the following information with you, if possible:

  • a legible list of your current medications and dosages, and a list of any allergies.
  • your insurance card and ID documents.
  • the name of your primary care physician.

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